AMSI Winter School 2017

on Computational Foundations of Data Science

Queensland University of Technology

26 June to 7 July 2017

The world is experiencing an explosion of digital data. It is without doubt that the era of data science has arrived, however, flourishing in today’s data-rich information age requires a strong analytical capability as well as advanced modelling skills to enable reliable and actionable knowledge to be extracted from data. The new and exciting research field of data science sees mathematical and statistical methods interact with information technologies to improve the knowledge mined and the outcomes inferred from the massive amounts of data generated worldwide each day. Understanding the computational foundations of data science will place you in the unique position of being able to tackle the fundamental challenge of “turning data into knowledge”. 

The aim of AMSI Winter School 2017 is to develop the next generation of quantitative scientists who can thrive in tomorrow’s information age. Our impressive lineup of international and national speakers will build your knowledge in large-scale computational methods of data science, and introduce you to a range of topical applications. The School will feature modules on Nonlinear Optimisation, Numerical Linear Algebra, Machine Learning, Bayesian Inference & Data Assimilation, High-Dimensional Statistics and Inverse Problems.

Hosted by Queensland University of Technology this winter, the School is designed for postgraduate students and early-career researchers in the mathematical sciences and cognate disciplines. Students and early-career researchers working specifically in computational aspects of data science are of course encouraged to attend: however, the school is a great opportunity for those working in other areas of the mathematical sciences to strengthen their computational mathematics toolkit.

PUBLIC LECTURE

Models, Maths and the Revolution in Weather Forecasting

Dr Peter May, Head of Research at the Bureau of Meteorology

There has been a quiet revolution in weather forecasting over the past few decades driven by big computers, big data and lots of maths, but it has been a hundred years in the making and represents a triumph of twenty-first century science. Dr. Peter May will tell the story of how computer weather and climate models have taken over and where they are leading us, but also on the 100 year long genesis of our modern weather models. This blends outrageous stories, big science, big data, satellites, supercomputing and much more to give us the systems that provide incredible detail on the weather, oceans and climate.  FIND OUT MORE

EVENT SPONSORS

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